“I’ll Be There For You”: Friends continues to charm audiences 25 years after it first airs

Could we BE any more excited?! (Image Source: CNBC)

By Viki Ntafillis | @viki_ntaf

Yep that’s right, folks.

This year is the 25th anniversary of Friends, which means that everything else happening right now is a moo point.

The American sit-com first aired with the episode “The Pilot” on 22 September, 1994, and was an instant hit with audiences, accumulating around 22 million people views.

By the time the show ended in 2004, after 10 seasons and 236 episodes, over 52.5 million viewers eagerly tuned in to watch the show’s finale.

The show’s milestone is proving no different.

It seems like everyone is keen to jump on the big, white dog bandwagon, and get in on the celebrations.

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This is how we should always enter rooms (Image Source: Pinterest).

Most recently, LEGO released an adorable replica of the Central Perk set, complete with the six characters, huge coffee mugs, the orange couch, and even a mini Gunther.

After a little investigating though, I discovered that it cost a crazy $90, and includes a mind-boggling total of 1,079 pieces.

Not to mention it sold out upon immediate release.

So basically, watching Friends probably remains the cheapest (and best) way to pay homage to its comedic greatness.

How is this the case, though?

How is it that a show, now a quarter of a century old, is still so damn good?

And even more amazingly, how is it still gaining young viewers, despite being set a whole generation before their time?

Die-hard Friends fan Kristina Perkas, 20, may hold the answer.

“I think what makes Friends still relatable and funny after 25 years is its ability to connect people to their families or familial relationships,” Ms Perkas said.

Friends defies the common idea of a “traditional family”. It shows us that we can choose our own families despite this.”

“No matter how challenging our family dynamics are…we choose to have our friends in our lives. This universal message keeps Friends alive, and it truly remains a timeless classic.”

Meanwhile, fellow fan Christopher Minos, 19, said Friends is still funny because the show’s humour focuses on the characters themselves.

“The humour is not current events related, it’s self-referential,” he said.

“Janice is funny because it focuses on the concept of the weird girlfriend. That’s never going to go away.

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If you can’t hear this picture, you may need to rethink your life choices (Image Source: Jetss).

“They’re actually fairly young, so a lot of us who grew up with Friends are approaching the age [the characters] were.

“It feels like you’re hanging out and chatting with your own friends.”

Mr Minos said Friends impacted his life so greatly that it even influenced his idea of what “funny” really was.

“Growing up, we watched it so much that it bled into our sense of humour,” he said.

“I thought Chandler was the funniest, so my own humour got modelled to be more about sarcasm and quick improv. responses.”

Ms Olman agreed that the nature of the sit-com had something to do with its success.

Friends is still relevant today because of its timeless themes of love and friendship…it’s a wholesome show with jokes that are always funny no matter how many times you have watched it,” she said.

At the end of the day, whatever you think of Friends, you have to admit that with its quick wit, wily innuendos and endearing nature, it’s one of the greatest shows of all time.

That’s why Friends and young people will always go together; like Joey and sandwiches or Monica and obsessive cleaning.

See? It’s our lobster.

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