As we commence the new year, we are also getting ready for one of Adelaide’s busiest times. (Image source: Adelaide Fringe/Facebook)

By Eva Blandis | @BlandisEva

There is no doubt that we all have some questions about what the 2021 Fringe will look like, but there is no need to worry.

The Adelaide Fringe will have previews running at particular venues from Monday, February 15, but the Fringe officially begins on Friday, February 19 and ends Sunday, March 21.

Heather Croall, Director and CEO of the Adelaide Fringe, says the festival will be run safely according to the evident COVID-19 concerns.

“We are working closely with venues to ensure they have COVID safe plans in place and are following all SA Health advice and guidelines,” she said.

Although the Fringe will take every step to ensure it still runs in a fun and efficient manner, there will be a few changes.

“More outdoor spaces [are] being activated and many events [will offer] online experiences, [meaning that] people will be able to enjoy the Fringe their way,” Ms Croall said.

As well as these positive changes, COVID-19 restrictions also mean limited tickets to events.

“There will be [fewer] tickets available to buy with capacity restrictions in place, so we encourage audiences to get in early so that they don’t miss out,” Ms Croall said.

However, Ms Croall strongly encourages Adelaideans to buy tickets to events “across the whole Fringe landscape and go and discover new venues and new artists,” even if they can’t get access to events initially sought after.

The Fringe 2021 will go ahead despite the threat of border closures and other impending possibilities.

“With restrictions on international travel in place we will see less international events in 2021 but still very strong participation from South Australian and interstate artists,” Ms Croall said.

Even if border restrictions are in place at the time, there will still be plenty of entertainment.

“Over 80 per cent of our 2021 program [comprises] of South Australian artists, and our audiences are always keen to get behind and support all events,” Ms Croall said.

“We have over 800 events registered so there will be no shortage of shows for audiences to choose from. The Fringe program is traditionally around 75 per cent to 80 per cent South Australian each year anyway.”

Although a lot has changed since the Fringe 2020, this coming festival still promises an exciting month of homegrown talent.

The one event destined to be missed by Fringe goers is the late night Fringe Club.

“We strongly encourage all Fringe goers to… support the local bars and clubs. The year has been particularly hard for them all and Fringe wants to show support,” Ms Croall said.

If anything, the Fringe 2021 will help us appreciate the talent around us and, more importantly, it will allow us to support those who are impacted by the pandemic.

The uncertainty that accompanies this year shrouds doubt on many things, but it also clarifies the importance of buying tickets to support South Australians at the Fringe 2021.