OTR Reporter Alycia Millar spoke to passionate protestors at the School Strike for Climate last Friday, May 21, capturing young people’s attitudes towards climate change and their reasons to keep advocating.

Reporter Alycia Millar speaks to attendees at the School Strike for Climate. (Camerawork: Anisha Pillarisetty, Multimedia Editor: Marco Krantis)

Read more about last week’s strike for climate action here.

TRANSCRIPT:

REPORTER:

All signs are pointing to urgent need for climate action. Moments ago, we were at the school strike for climate led by school students, an initiative to provoke change for climate action.

(Crowd Chanting):

The seas are rising, no more compromising. The seas are rising, no more compromising (x3).

REPORTER:

What brings you out here today?

TADHG:

I come along to as many climate strikes as I possibly can. I have been an activist of some kind for the last seven or eight years since I moved to Adelaide when I was 19.

I have seen a lot of campaigns come and go, like the fight for the bight, and the fight against nuclear power and a general struggle to actually transition society away from all these fossil fuels and these things that are really destroying the planet.

I’m here to show support for the young people rising up, and really caring about it and getting out in the streets. It has been a really nice movement to see, it has managed to make people stop and think and I hope it keeps making people stop and think.

It is really nice seeing lots of people supporting, you also get a nice little thrill when you see someone shaking their fists at these young scalawags because they care too much.

REPORTER:

What makes you passionate about climate action?

TADHG:

I guess I am the generation before the kids striking now, when I was in high school this was still a big thing. This is like 10 or so years ago at least now, but it was still something everybody talks about then and something that is really hitting home now.

Even people like myself were thinking about it then, this is my generation and if I go on to have a career, have a family, all these sorts of things will be happening to my family, my generation, people I grew up with. It is going to happen to us.

People older than us, maybe they think they are just going to outlive the crisis, but I don’t think that is really the case anymore. If you are around for the next 10 years you are going to see the start of a very serious crisis. And that scares me when I think about it too much, but I’m also being an optimist and doing things about it.

REPORTER:

Do you have a take-home message from today?

TADHG:

I think no one is going to change the world by themselves. Lots of people who I have seen get involved in activism and think they have the answer for everything, and even if you do have the answer for everything, you are still going to need other people.

You need to go to rallies; you need to be organising actions that disrupt the system in one way or another. You need other people full stop. That is my main advice, you need to work in groups of people to achieve things. Whether that is in your neighbourhood or you’re coming along to rallies like this.

REPORTER:

What brings you out here today?

PEARL:

My boyfriend and I are currently travelling Australia, we are from northern New South Wales, so I was very lucky to be in the city at this time because I’m here for a very important cause.

That is protecting country and protesting against the government and what they are currently not doing for climate change and for protecting our sacred country, Australia.

I am very grateful that I could make it today and much of what I believe in for protecting country and ensuring we have a safe future to live in which currently is looking like we won’t.

REPORTER:

Do you have a take-home message from today?

PEARL:

Yes, I do I strongly believe that First Nations justice and climate justice of the same thing and without First Nations leadership and elevated voices, we won’t get a safe future and we won’t get country protected so my take-home message is that to take care of country we must listen to our First Nations voices, must elevate their voices and put them in leadership positions so that we will have a chance of saving our future.

REPORTER:

What brings you guys here today?

STUDENT 1:

It is very important to care about our environment because it is our future and without it, nothing else matters.

STUDENT 2:

I think it is important to fight against the wankers that don’t care about our futures because they are just old and yeah.

STUDENT 1:

They have no idea what is important and what is not, they care more about the economy than literally everything; our planet our environment and without it we are nothing. We literally do not exist. Money does not exist, money is not real, so like why do we even care.

STUDENT 2:

Exactly!